Pacific Northwest, Spring Into Summer

The Pacific Northwest has been coming alive this paddling season with the widespread introduction of the unlimited canoes that are now becoming more common at each race.

The 19 PNW-ORCA clubs and our Canadian friends to the north have seen a resurgence of excitement about learning a newer, more precise paddling discipline, and I can safely say that the stoke level is pretty high!

False Creek Coed at Jericho Iron Race by Kendall’s Clicks

May and June saw our paddlers intermixed in a variety of long distance and sprint races. The long distance paddlers found themselves racing in Frenchman’s Bar for the Rusty Iron Race, Jericho, British Columbia for the Jericho Iron, and Burnaby, British Columbia for the Lotus Iron Race.

Rooster Rock Race Men’s Start by Drea Park

The sprinters stayed a bit more local to the greater Seattle area and were working hard to make sure they put in qualifying times for the 2018 World Sprints that will be held in Tahiti.
Looking forward, we have a busy July and August ahead of us. The Gorge has already been rocking with massive windy days making for some epic downwind conditions. The Gorge Iron race will be held on July 15th followed by a week of downwind surfing and the Gorge Downwind Champs held in Hood River, OR. The end of July will find paddlers up in the Seattle area racing at da Grind, in Bellingham at the Bellingham Bay Classic and finally getting ourselves ready to travel to Hawai’i for the Queen’s race, Pailolo and Moloka’i.

See ya on the water, Tyler Irwin

[See image gallery at www.pacificpaddler.com ]

Pacific Paddler is A MAGAZINE FOR PADDLERS BY PADDLERS: to bring the excitement of outrigger paddling to a larger audience. Pacific Paddler covers all facets of paddling and outrigger racing including OC6, OC1, OC2, V1, O6, V6, OC4, SUP, Surfski, Canoe Surfing and more from all around the world! Our Focus is on paddling and the active lifestyle that goes with it. Paddling is a sport for everyone, any gender any age from 6 to 86. We want to encourage novice paddlers to join clubs and older paddlers to try it out.

http://pacificpaddler.com

Solomon Islands Taumako Voyaging Canoes

What a day it was! On 4 June, for the first time in over 30 years, a tepuke voyaging canoe from Taumako Island arrived in Temotu Province’s capital on Santa Cruz.

Local residents turned out in droves to welcome the voyagers and help haul the massive vaka onto shore.

A workman carefully caulks a seam with a traditional mixture of breadfruit sap and bark shavings

Children clambered eagerly over the hull, and older folks fondly recalled the days when dozens of these canoes plied Temotu’s waters and called at Santa Cruz.

Crew members and supporters lash together the massive foe vaka (steering paddle) with coconut fiber cordage. Taumako voyaging canoes are built entirely of local plant materials. No fiberglass, dacron, or other modern substances are used

“My grandmother arrived here on a tepuke,” said Wendy Laia. “I would like to sail in one myself to honor her memory.” She may soon have an opportunity to do this. Captain Ambrose Miki and his crew brought the canoe to Santa Cruz to demonstrate the Taumako people’s skills of building and sailing these traditional vaka, and to teach people of other islands how to revive their own canoe construction and sailing customs.

Friends and family members escort the vaka to the edge of Taumako’s lagoon as it begins its voyage

Having successfully finished their Holau Ndeni (voyage to Ndeni—Santa Cruza), Captain Miki and his fellow seafarers plan to sail to the Banks Islands in northern Vanuatu later this year, probably in early November. Anyone interested in following their progress or learning more about Taumako voyaging canoes can do so at www.vaka.org and “vakataumako” on facebook.

Story and photos by H. Wyeth and Dr. Mimi George

The tepuke sails under a rainbow during its voyage to Santa Cruz
Pacific Paddler is A MAGAZINE FOR PADDLERS BY PADDLERS: to bring the excitement of outrigger paddling to a larger audience. Pacific Paddler covers all facets of paddling and outrigger racing including OC6, OC1, OC2, V1, O6, V6, OC4, SUP, Surfski, Canoe Surfing and more from all around the world! Our Focus is on paddling and the active lifestyle that goes with it. Paddling is a sport for everyone, any gender any age from 6 to 86. We want to encourage novice paddlers to join clubs and older paddlers to try it out.

http://pacificpaddler.com

Kai Ko’o

We started making paddles in 2012 because we had a hard time getting quality race blades from Hawaii.

You needed to know someone who knew someone else who could get you in contact with a paddle maker.

If you did manage to get in contact with a paddle maker, the wait time was months and sometimes years long. In the end, we decided to try and build our own and the rest is history.

Our first paddle was a prototype that looked as bad as it performed. We had nothing to go off of, so we improvised and tested our prototypes with our own club paddlers and paddlers from Hawaii. It was a slow process, but we listened to feedback and made improvements with each new design.

We wanted to make high quality wood blades that were both comfortable and effective in all conditions. We wanted to give people the opportunity to customize their blades to their liking. Making the paddle accessible to anyone at a reasonable price was also a top priority. We know a good product cannot stand solely on it’s own, so we pride ourselves on our customer service.

We use a variety of woods such as balsa, poplar, and cedar. We also incorporate composite materials such as carbon fiber and fiberglass. Finding the right combination of natural and composite materials is what makes paddle making so challenging and fun.

We make a wide variety of blades for almost every condition and paddler. Our two most popular models are our Puhi and the Kala race blades. The Puhi is our OC6 blade that is geared more towards the male paddler. The Kala has a smaller surface area and works really well for women’s crews as well as OC1 paddlers. We’re a custom paddle maker, so we also cater to personal adjustments that people want to make to our current models. We understand that not everyone is built the same and that having the ability to customize your blade both in specs and aesthetics is a good thing.

You can find our blades at Island Paddler or Polynesian Paddle Products (P3). You can also contact us online at kaikoopaddles.com .

Pacific Paddler is A MAGAZINE FOR PADDLERS BY PADDLERS: to bring the excitement of outrigger paddling to a larger audience. Pacific Paddler covers all facets of paddling and outrigger racing including OC6, OC1, OC2, V1, O6, V6, OC4, SUP, Surfski, Canoe Surfing and more from all around the world! Our Focus is on paddling and the active lifestyle that goes with it. Paddling is a sport for everyone, any gender any age from 6 to 86. We want to encourage novice paddlers to join clubs and older paddlers to try it out.

http://pacificpaddler.com

Historical Sketch For Fitness Training

While collecting information on an exposé about Toots Minvielle’s life’s accomplishments I kept running across the dominant clubs, teams, and those that coached them throughout that time frame (1952-present).

Peter Caldwell did an excellent job of documenting the history of the Molokai races. Within that treasure trove is a collection of results of season-long training sessions.

The Outrigger Canoe Club Archives also has excellent historical articles about training regimes.

All of this history is the result of Toots taking the time to expand this sport internationally. A time line of when and how that came about is in the works.

  The IPCF (now IVF) historical records is filled with the who’s who of sprinting. This year finally the IVF has come up with the true Marathon event whereby a country is represented by one individual crew entry in a category per country. That pars down the finish podium to the best from each country unlike the major big races around the world. Mind you that IPCF/IVF had long distances events around and during their past World Sprints events beginning with the first event in 1984 in Long Beach, California.

  So getting back to the main object of the article, coaching and training styles. George “Dad” Center was Outrigger Canoe Club’s Captain (coach) from 1913-1942. During those years he trained some of the best swimmers, paddlers, and all around athletes. His accolades of training Olympic swimmers is historical. From him sprang a wealth of athletes that became coaches that went on to train other athletes.

  The concept of putting the time in with good training habits is easy to say, but in reality it takes the drive and sacrifices to maintain that habit in a team situation. In Hawaii weather is not a factor unless there is a tropical storm and then you can train inside. The water training workout is conducive to time on the water. In tropical waters, swell direction and air & water temperature have that advantage for year-round training. The teams in IVF today are starting to get that sense of dedication that it takes to knock off seconds in a 2000-meter or 5-mile run.

  In Tahiti in the early 80’s, Pirae’s Edward Maamaatua was given several K-1 and C-1 Olympic boats by the French national canoe team because of Tahiti’s athletes natural water competitiveness. From that meeting and gifts sprang forth their new designed canoes. Along with the designs a training format of working on technique, putting quality time in on the water, using varying strokes throughout the particular events was all taken in. Along with varied dry land training sessions they began to see better results. Put into that mix a benefactor of a sponsorship, you now have an excellent chance of getting the best paddlers to join your team. But when you have 40 of the top paddlers, how do you choose? It can come down to youth, desire, and/or talent. The competition calendar is also a factor. Tahiti has over 50 events in a year, and 2 months out of the year they don’t have races because of the rain factor. It’s simple math, you put more quality time as a team under racing conditions, you will finish in the upper brackets. Using the V-1 as an added training tool for conditioning puts individuals into team boats easier. Putting in a little incentive of money doesn’t hurt to sweeten the pot for working harder in the case of Tahiti.

  During Offshore Canoe Club’s run for the Molokai podium we gathered athletes that had credentials with impeccable training habits. It was nothing for anyone of them to do a hard water work out then go for a 40 mile bike ride to cool down. Each individual was an aquatic marathon workout-infused and dedicated true athlete, and like most clubs, when there is a change in leadership, so goes the crews.

  In Australia, the surf boat clubs were and are the basis for hard training regimes. Their cross training in aquatic themes is their basis for staying fit 365 days a year.

  In Hawaii, now there are teams that are concentrating on 365 day training. They are showing some improvement in knocking off the precious seconds and minutes at those events they enjoy going to. Some clubs are seriously looking towards their youth to carry on the quest for athletic dominance, which was also Dad and Toots themes also.

 There are now clubs, teams, trainers, clinics, and seminars accomplishing this desire to get faster longer. Did it spring from Dad Center’s coaching talents and his protégées or was it Toots who started to spread the sport first to California, then to England, France, Germany, and Australia? Toots and Bob Fisher, from Outrigger, did go to Tahiti in 1974 to discuss coming to Hawaii for competition. All of this history is usable as a coach or trainer, if they understand the concepts.

Hopefully this will give some insight to those clubs’ training now that working hard is just part of the formula of standing on that podium.

 Bud Hohl

captions

“Dad” was the coach of many of the now legendary coaches and athletes, in Hawaii. This is from the book “Duke, the life story of Duke Kahanamoku” by Joseph Brennan. It shows Duke, the protegee and Dad Center, the coach, after coming home from an Olympic conquest.

This is Toots sitting on the very first fiberglass outrigger surf canoe built in 1954. He was a man before his time.

 

Pacific Paddler is A MAGAZINE FOR PADDLERS BY PADDLERS: to bring the excitement of outrigger paddling to a larger audience. Pacific Paddler covers all facets of paddling and outrigger racing including OC6, OC1, OC2, V1, O6, V6, OC4, SUP, Surfski, Canoe Surfing and more from all around the world! Our Focus is on paddling and the active lifestyle that goes with it. Paddling is a sport for everyone, any gender any age from 6 to 86. We want to encourage novice paddlers to join clubs and older paddlers to try it out.

http://pacificpaddler.com

Ka Lei O Ka Lanakila

A fundraiser for Healani Canoe Club

The OC6 iron racing season runs from March through May. On May 7th, Healani Canoe Club hosted their Ka Lei O Ka Lanakila iron.

The Oahu Hawaiian Canoe Racing Association sanctioned the race which is also a fundraiser for the club. Healani opened the event with a ‘pule’, a hula that seemed to invoke paddling, and a welcoming haka.

The club had breakfast waiting for early arrivals. After a coaches and steersmen meeting, the canoes launched and lined up between the club site and the Mokauea Fishing Village.

The first race of the day was the short course, juniors and coed. Their course was around Mokauea Island and back. The lagoon was still, no clouds and calm with a slight swell rolling in over the reef. Crews had to get across the reef through a narrow channel. From there they skirted the reef until they reached the main channel and made their way back to the starting line. The Long Course did the course twice. There were plenty of crews out to have fun, and everyone was rewarded with a delicious lunch which included fried salmon, mac salad, green salad and rice. The winners received packets of Hawaiian sea salt and trophies were handed out.

Pacific Paddler is A MAGAZINE FOR PADDLERS BY PADDLERS: to bring the excitement of outrigger paddling to a larger audience. Pacific Paddler covers all facets of paddling and outrigger racing including OC6, OC1, OC2, V1, O6, V6, OC4, SUP, Surfski, Canoe Surfing and more from all around the world! Our Focus is on paddling and the active lifestyle that goes with it. Paddling is a sport for everyone, any gender any age from 6 to 86. We want to encourage novice paddlers to join clubs and older paddlers to try it out.

http://pacificpaddler.com

New V6 Racing Canoe Is Here

Pacific Paddler is excited to introduce the Vantage6 from IHE Canoe and Designs.

It is a computer generated and drag tested legal spec canoe.

A new ama has also been created. The designer is Steve Blyth of his old company, Wilder Canoe.

The Vantage 6 has been put through a head to head comparison water test, in 2-to-3-foot max conditions. She came out on top. One comment was, “She dropped in easier and carried further.” This is what he wanted to hear. As this is the biggest characteristic you want improvement in as a designer. Another comment was, “She spun as well in the trough,” which tells people that the canoe is maneuverable.

Steve has great respect for all canoe builders and designers. But of course a designer enjoys the challenge of creating something that performs at a higher level. He said, “All designers are trying to design the best all around performer.” So Steve wanted to design this new 6 man to perform at a higher level in the smaller conditions, 4-foot and under. Steve believes he has done this with the new Vantage 6.

There was also a need for another legal spec canoe with Karel Tresnak retiring.

The Vantage 6, V6, will be produced in Hilo by Frank Haug. He was with Force Marine for 25 years and built the 20 or so Patterson canoe. Frank and Steve have gone over every aspect of the building process and have come up with some innovative ideas with the build as well. We want to build the most durable and stiffest polyester/fiberglasscanoe possible. So Steve is saying “you will see a few different things on the Vantage 6” that are new and innovative construction and design wise. Steve “wanted the canoe to feel smaller and lighter” for a 400lb canoe. He said “there are things you can do to achieve this and be at the same weight”.

Blyth has done well in the past with the WaveBlade/Polaris hull, WaveBlade 2 and the Vantage one man. Of course he hopes the Vantage 6 will perform at a high level and add to the fun of outrigger canoe racing.

Steve wants to say mahalo to his great naval architect, investors, builder and friends that helped to get this project to fruition. And of course the Creator!

See the IHE Canoe & Designs ad on page 9 or call (808) 987-5680.

 

Pacific Paddler is A MAGAZINE FOR PADDLERS BY PADDLERS: to bring the excitement of outrigger paddling to a larger audience. Pacific Paddler covers all facets of paddling and outrigger racing including OC6, OC1, OC2, V1, O6, V6, OC4, SUP, Surfski, Canoe Surfing and more from all around the world! Our Focus is on paddling and the active lifestyle that goes with it. Paddling is a sport for everyone, any gender any age from 6 to 86. We want to encourage novice paddlers to join clubs and older paddlers to try it out.

http://pacificpaddler.com

Preventing shoulder pain

Shoulder pain is one of the two most common sources of pain for canoe paddlers along with low back pain.

As training ramps up for the six-man season, it’s important to consider if your shoulders are ready for the demands of paddling over the next six months.

By the time long distance season rolls around, many paddlers have started to develop shoulder pain, but what if that pain could be prevented?

The shoulder joint is unique in that it allows for large degrees of motion in multiple directions, but this increased motion also makes the shoulder more susceptible to injury. The shoulder joint is a “ball and socket” joint, and is often compared to a golf ball sitting on a golf tee. Basically, the ball part of the joint is bigger than the socket which allows for increased motion, but can also lead to instability. Luckily, we have four rotator cuff muscles attached around the shoulder joint to help compress the ball part of the joint into the socket which creates stability. The problem is, most people have underdeveloped or weak rotator cuff muscles which can lead to the ball part of the joint moving around too much during the paddling stroke leading to “impingement” of certain structures and pain.

Consider how many strokes a paddler may take during a one hour pre-season race. Sixty strokes a minute multiplied by 60 minutes comes out to 3600 strokes. If the rotator cuff muscles aren’t doing their job, it can lead to significant “impingement” over the course of 3600 strokes. It’s a recipe for shoulder pain! The good news is that it’s early in the season, and here are a few simple rotator cuff exercises to improve your shoulder joint stability and decrease risk of shoulder pain throughout the season.

Three direction isometric hold: keep shoulder blades pinched down and back. Hold for 2-3 sets of 1 min using 3-5# weight.

Bilateral external rotation with band: rotate arms outward as you pinch shoulder blades down and back.

Side lying external rotation: keep elbow bent at 90 degrees and rotate arm outward. 2 sets of 15 reps with 3-5# weight.

By Tim Chang PT, DPT

 

Pacific Paddler is A MAGAZINE FOR PADDLERS BY PADDLERS: to bring the excitement of outrigger paddling to a larger audience. Pacific Paddler covers all facets of paddling and outrigger racing including OC6, OC1, OC2, V1, O6, V6, OC4, SUP, Surfski, Canoe Surfing and more from all around the world! Our Focus is on paddling and the active lifestyle that goes with it. Paddling is a sport for everyone, any gender any age from 6 to 86. We want to encourage novice paddlers to join clubs and older paddlers to try it out.

http://pacificpaddler.com

George Perry Memorial Race

Over 102 crews of young paddlers raced in Kailua Bay. Conditions were perfect

The George Perry Memorial Race is an event for young paddlers. It’s held annually at Kailua Beach Park.

There are seven age group brackets from 10 and under to 18 and under. Approximately 600 young paddlers took part in the event that was hosted by Lanikai Canoe Club.

The course was set within Kailua Bay. There were six heats. The youngest division, 10-and-under, raced a 1/4-mile from Popoia (‘Flat Island’) to Kailua Beach. The other age groups 12s, 13s, 14s, 15s, 16s and 18s had a longer course. Their race started and finished in front of the beach and included a ‘leg’ around ‘Flat Island’.

All the day’s results are posted at https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4uGGXRIxYVLRkdEMTZuTE1Mdk0/view. Race photos are up on our Pacific Paddler Facebook page.

Tay Perry stands in front of the race banner dedicated to his father, George Perry. George was a kahuna kālai wa’a (master canoe carver) and founder of Lanikai Canoe Club in 1953. Tay and his father built Lanikai’s first racing canoe, Ka Ehukai, from a koa log. Since then Tay has built four more koa canoes from scratch and restored 16. Tay is an active paddler at Lanikai Canoe Club taking part in many of the races throughout the year. Tay is still restoring koa canoes at his workshop down in the industrial quarters of Sand Island, a stones throw away from Keehi Lagoon where many of the canoes he has brought to life have raced.

[See image gallery at www.pacificpaddler.com ]

Pacific Paddler is A MAGAZINE FOR PADDLERS BY PADDLERS: to bring the excitement of outrigger paddling to a larger audience. Pacific Paddler covers all facets of paddling and outrigger racing including OC6, OC1, OC2, V1, O6, V6, OC4, SUP, Surfski, Canoe Surfing and more from all around the world! Our Focus is on paddling and the active lifestyle that goes with it. Paddling is a sport for everyone, any gender any age from 6 to 86. We want to encourage novice paddlers to join clubs and older paddlers to try it out.

http://pacificpaddler.com

From Hook To Plate

Being extremely new to paddling but an avid shore fisherman, I’ve always been intrigued by the art and romance of blending the two.

You’re taking the two most “Hawaiian” things, fishing and paddling, and combining them into a sport that truly is worthy of legendary status.

In fact Maui, the most famous demi-god and the mythological being known for fishing out the Hawaiian Islands with a single fish hook and a self-propelled canoe, just may be the first ‘being’ to have fished from his personal Ocean Canoe.

Knowing the story of Maui and his heroic efforts in Hawaiian mythology, there are only two legends that currently walk on land (or to some, walk on water) whom I would ever seek advice and learn the ropes of OC1 fishing from. Those two are Kai Bartlett and Kekoa Cramer and from both of them I have learned what produces.

Being that our Kai Wa’a canoes are so light and quick in the ocean, my main style of fishing is trolling. Starting with the rod and reel I like to run a short 5ft graphite ‘jigging’ rod with a graphite Penn warfare reel for lightweight and durability. My Penn reel is stuffed with 200 yards of braided 80lbs test spectra and I splice in 100 yards of 60lb test fluorocarbon. It’s my personal preference, but I don’t run any swivels; it seems I get more strikes.

Attached to the end of my fluorocarbon, typically I’ll run a 15-30ft diving lure. Of course it all depends on location and conditions. If you asked…. the most telling secret of any trolling fisherman, whether you’re on a motorized boat or a self-propelled, is the color and action on the lure. There are some locations that the fish tend to feed on the surface and others that the fish feed closer to the bottom. It seems to vary based on how their preferred prey behave. But if the predators are hungry, you’ll get action.

On board I carry a tail rope to secure the catch as the toughest part of landing a good sized fish is securing them to the canoe. I also carry a hand gaff to handle the fish a little easier once I get it closer to the canoe. I carry a dive knife for safety and dispatching the catch plus back up lures.

On this one particular trip, I launched solo and paddled out to one of my favorite spots off of Maui. Usually I get to the zone prior to dropping my line in so I can get out there a little quicker and anticipate the sun rising. I trolled around for about 15 minutes, then 30 and then 45, but I had zero action. I switched lures to a shallow diver and trolled for another 30 minutes with nothing happening. Off in the distance there were a few whales in front of me, so I decided to head a little deeper and again switched my lure, this time to an old favorite. I let it back, locked the drag and not more than 3 minutes after that… fish was on! The strike was really unassuming, a couple good jerks but that was it. I could tell the fish was still on but it stopped running. I picked up the pole and set the hook, and just as I did that the fish started “screaming”. It pulled me around for about 5 minutes until I finally got on top of it and started to get it off the bottom. The ulua made a few more runs, but I could tell it was tiring. After 15 minutes, I finally got it to the surface and slowly pulled it closer, gaffed it in the mouth and pulled it on my lap. I then dispatched it with my dive knife and slowly made my way back to shore. After I bled it and got it home it weighed in at 61.5lbs. My biggest ulua ever.

By Chef Isaac Bancaco

“Hamajang” Ulua Poisson Cru

Serves 4 Local’s or 10 Wailea housewives

Prep time: 30 min

2# Ulua, boneless, skinless, cubed

1ea Maui onion

5 cloves garlic

1T coconut oil

1c coconut milk

2oz Adoboloco “Hamajang” hot sauce

3 limes, juice only

1T fish sauce

10 leaves Mint, torn

10 leaves Thai Basil, torn

Hawaiian Salt to taste

Dice Ulua into desired sized cubes, cover with plastic and reserve under refrigeration. Roast Maui onion, husk on in the oven for 25 minutes at 350 degrees. Remove onion from the oven, cool to room temperature then remove outer skin and stem. Place in the blender and puree. Place garlic in cold water and bring to a boil, discard water. Repeat process 3 times then blend with a splash of water until smooth and wet sand like. Remove Ulua from the refrigerator, season with Hawaiian salt, add onion puree, garlic puree and all other ingredients except the lime juice. Let sit for 5 minutes to marinate and then add the lime juice.

Chefs Note: It’s important to add the lime juice last to ensure flavor penetrating through the fish prior to the acid in the lime juice cooking and closing off the pores of the fish. Additionally Ulua is such a dense fish, over marinating it will toughen even further. Think of the acid as sealing the flavor within the ulua as opposed to keeping it out.

Pairing: Goes best with a Maui Brewing Company-Coconut Porter and fresh crisped Taro Chips

 

Pacific Paddler is A MAGAZINE FOR PADDLERS BY PADDLERS: to bring the excitement of outrigger paddling to a larger audience. Pacific Paddler covers all facets of paddling and outrigger racing including OC6, OC1, OC2, V1, O6, V6, OC4, SUP, Surfski, Canoe Surfing and more from all around the world! Our Focus is on paddling and the active lifestyle that goes with it. Paddling is a sport for everyone, any gender any age from 6 to 86. We want to encourage novice paddlers to join clubs and older paddlers to try it out.

http://pacificpaddler.com

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Pacific Paddler is A MAGAZINE FOR PADDLERS BY PADDLERS: to bring the excitement of outrigger paddling to a larger audience. Pacific Paddler covers all facets of paddling and outrigger racing including OC6, OC1, OC2, V1, O6, V6, OC4, SUP, Surfski, Canoe Surfing and more from all around the world! Our Focus is on paddling and the active lifestyle that goes with it. Paddling is a sport for everyone, any gender any age from 6 to 86. We want to encourage novice paddlers to join clubs and older paddlers to try it out.

http://pacificpaddler.com

Outrigger racing, racing outrigger canoes, paddling surfski, paddle oc1